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Breaking the Mould: Challenging the Past through Pottery

Occasional Publication No 4.
Edited by Ina Berg.
Archaeopress : BAR S1861 2008
ISBN: 9781407303444
Price: £28.00

In October 2006, the 3rd International Conference on Prehistoric Ceramics, entitled ‘Breaking the Mould: Challenging the Past through Pottery’, was hosted by the Department of Archaeology on behalf of the Prehistoric Ceramics Research Group and The Prehistoric Society at the University of Manchester. Contents: 1) Skill amongst the sherds: understanding the role of skill in the early to late Middle Bronze Age in Hungary (Sandy Budden);2) Thinking outside of the pot: what other containers can tell us about the inception of ceramics in the Neolithic Near East (Rachel Conroy); 3) The trajectory of the wheel-coiling technique in the southern Levant: historical scenarios and explanatory mechanisms (Valentine Roux); 4) Undecorated Calatagan pots as active symbols of cultural affiliation (Grace Barretto-Tesoro); 5) Pottery and feasting in central Sweden (Thomas Eriksson); 6) A re-evaluation of the pottery assemblages from Ville-es-Nouaux, Les Platons and La Hougue Mauger, Jersey, Channel Islands (Paul-David Francis Driscoll); 7) Thoughts and adjustments in the potter’s backyard (Olivier Gosselain); 8) The hand that makes the pot…: craft traditions in South Sweden in the third millennium BC (Åsa M. Larsson); 9) The vessel as a human body: Neolithic anthropomorphic vessels and their reflection in later periods (Goce Naumov); 10) Influence from the ‘Group Rhin-Suisse-France Orientale’ on the pottery from the Late Bronze Age urnfields in western Belgium. A confrontation between pottery forming technology, 14C dates and typo-chronology (Guy de Mulder, Walter Leclercq and Mark Strydonck);11) Dating a pot beaker and the surrounding landscape using OSL dating (Simone B.C. Bloo, Frieda S. Zuidhoff, Jakob Wallinga and Candice A. Johns)

123 pages; illustrated throughout with figures, maps, plans, drawings and photographs..


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